Archive for the ‘Ask An Agent’ Category

Ask an Agent/ Does it matter who pays me?

December 1, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column tackling all your dilemmas about the photography industry – the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.comQuestions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

This month an interesting question about a client having a change of heart on who’s paying!

Lisa

Dear Ask an Agent

I’ve been in discussions about a really nice shoot for the last few weeks with a small marketing agency and I’ve just got the go ahead. Now I’ve reminded them that I need the production expenses covering in advance of the shoot they’ve said I need to invoice their client directly as it will be quicker. Should I agree to this? What are the pros and cons? There are models and locations and quite a few other shoot expenses on this one so I’m in a bit of a vulnerable position.

Anonymous

Thanks for getting in touch. There shouldn’t necessarily be any cons to this as long as you are diligent with the small print, although it’s not ideal that your client has moved the goal posts this late in the day.

The thing is, this issue isn’t simply about ascertaining who is going to pay you, it is about determining who you are entering into a business arrangement with. Usually the person who pays you is also the person that accepts your terms of business (and vice versa) as these are attached (or should be!) to your estimate and your invoice. So if it’s the marketing agency’s client, they are not only now taking on the financial responsibility but also all the responsibilities that come with commissioning a photoshoot.

_MG_7976

Behind the Scenes / Julian Calverley

Let me just clarify a bit more. Any estimate or invoice you send out should not just include costs, it should include a full set of your business terms which should be accepted (or negotiated) by the client along with the costs. You payment terms is part of this, but a photographers business terms should include several key things to protect your business including cancellation terms, specifics about the usage licence, who is accepting liability of third party clearances and lots of other important stuff.

So, you’ll need to start from scratch in a way. Resend your original estimate, addressed to the your ‘new’ client and once your costs and business terms have been agreed by them, and not before, you can crack on with the shoot.

I hope that helps. There is some more information and a full set of photographer business terms and conditions in my book “Setting Up a Successful Photography Business’’ which will shed a bit more light on this very important area of your business.

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Halloween Special with Guest Blogger ‘Super Lawyer’ Charles Swan

October 31, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column tackling all your dilemmas about the photography industry – the photography industry’s very own Agony Aunt!

This month we bring you an Ask an Agent Halloween special. Lisa invites lawyer supremo Charles Swan, from leading media and creative law firm Swan Turton, to advise on trademarks in Halloween masks.

Charlie Informal No 2

Charles Swan from Swan Turton

Dear Ask an Agent,

I’ve been asked to use Halloween masks in a shoot for a new soft drink and I’m just wondering if there might be any potential issues with trademarks and copyrights? For example what if I featured Frankenstein or Dracula? And whose responsibility would this be, the advertising agency’s or mine as the photographer?

Robbie Brown

Thanks for your question Robbie, I believe there could be some issues with particular masks whose characters might have trademarks. I remember being asked to produce a shoot featuring Batman once and indemnify the client against any third party claims. I was heavily advised by a lawyer not to do so, as the trademark for Batman is owned by the Walt Disney Company/Marvel Entertainment and associating Batman with another brand could be seen as falsely claiming that a brand is endorsing another brand.

In terms of whose responsibility this is, it needs to be made clear from the onset in writing. We incorporate in our terms and conditions the following clause to cover us just in case.

INDEMNITY. The Photographer and LPA shall only be responsible for obtaining clearance in respect of third party copyright works, trademarks, designs or other intellectual property if this has been expressly agreed in writing before the shoot. In all other cases the Client shall be responsible for obtaining such clearances and will indemnify the Photographer and LPA against all expenses, damages, claims and legal costs arising out of any failure to obtain such clearances.

And we also have a paragraph on the front of all our estimates and invoices headed ‘Important Information’ to reaffirm points like this for those clients that don’t read the ‘small print’

However, it shouldn’t simply be a case of passing the buck. As a professional photographer you should be aware of the potential hazards of shoot production and at least flag up the fact that there might be an issue to your client before they land themselves in trouble.

Anyway, I’m not a lawyer and sometimes it’s worth consulting one. So I asked Charlie Swan, one of the country’s top media lawyers and partner at Swan Turton, to shed a bit more light on the matter. Here’s what he had to say…

‘Although Frankenstein and Dracula are characters from out of copyright (public domain) novels, there is artistic copyright in specific versions of their appearance created for movies, comics etc. There might also be registered trade marks and using particular masks in a soft drink ad could indeed provoke a passing off (false endorsement) claim by the rights owner.

The key here is to make sure you warn your client, in writing, of the possible risk and get your client’s confirmation, again in writing, that they will be responsible for any necessary third party clearances. Most photographers’ terms and conditions will include an indemnity similar to your clause, but you should still put this in writing – to avoid arguments further down the line about who said what.

One thing you must avoid doing is saying anything to your client that might be construed as legal advice. It’s the agency’s job, not yours, to get legal advice about potentially risky elements of advertising photographs. If a client asks you whether something like a mask or a building or a designer sofa is ok to include in a shot, you should explain to them that they need to get their own advice. Otherwise, if a claim does materialise, the client may try to pass liability on to you. When the sh** hits the fan, everyone in the room tries to hide behind the next person!’

foto1057© Oliver Haupt. For illustration purposes only.

Charles Swan is a partner at Swan Turton LLP, his clients include leading advertising, marketing and design agencies, advertisers, trade associations, image libraries, photographers, agents, publishers and artists. Charles heads the firm’s Advertising & Marketing and Photography & Visual Arts Groups. He is rated by Thomson Reuter as a UK Super Lawyer and by Chambers & Partners as a Band 1 Advertising & Marketing lawyer, is Honorary President of Adlaw International, a member of the Advertising Lawyers Group and is a director of the Association of Photographers.

Whether you’re a creative director or a student, a photographer or a designer, an art buyer or an assistant, if you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Model fees for Moving Image

September 30, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – like a photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, or at whatever level, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Lisa

Dear Ask an Agent,

I am preparing an estimate for a shoot which involves stills and moving image. My question is, apart from my own fees and equipment for moving image do I need to allow for extra for the model fees?

Darren Orange, photographer, Leeds.

Hi Darren,

Whenever you are preparing costs or booking models be very clear about the final usage as this is the one area that can come back and bite you on the bum!

The thing to do is put the exact end usage in an email to the model agencies when you are gathering your costs. So even though it may be online and digital content, 2 years, for example, you should also clarify that this will involve stills and moving image. Then if you do get the job, put the usage in writing again along with the fee available based on your previous research and agreement with the client, and check the model booking forms have the correct information. I know I might sound a bit paranoid but I’ve had several instances where models have attempted to charge more after the shoot as they misinterpreted the usage, and if it’s set out in writing they don’t get very far.

JL_201308_Simple_2682

© Julian Love

Some model agencies might not charge any extra for moving image whilst some will, and it’ll be sods law that your client will want to use models from the agency that charge extra. As with any suppliers, we always get a number (usually 3) of quotes to check that we are in the right ball park and quote the client somewhere in between, or what we think is achievable within the clients budget and nature of the shoot.

I was recently quoted a day rate of 18K from one model agency for a small corporate job which involved moving image on the clients website, needless to say I didn’t think it a good idea to include this figure in my estimate if I ever wanted to hear from my client again! As I say most agencies quote pretty reasonable fees for moving image for digital content and at the end of the day it’s going to be your client who dictates the model fees available, not you – something which model agencies often fail to acknowledge.

Please Note:

We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.

We reserve the right not to enter into on going correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Who wants to see my portfolio at an Advertising Agency?

August 29, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Lisa

Dear Ask an Agent,

I’ve finally got a printed portfolio together with a view to trying to get my foot in the door with some ad agencies. Can you advise me on who I should try and show it to?

John Oliver, photographer.

Hi John,

The best people to show your book to in an ad agency are the art buyers, art directors and creative directors.

It is the art buyer’s job to source photographers suitable for a campaign, negotiate the shoot costs and oversee the production process, making sure everything is delivered on time and in budget. Some of the smaller agencies don’t have art buyers or they have different job titles such as creative services manager or project manager for example.

The art buyer liaises with the ‘creatives’ as to what kind of photographer would be right for the campaign they have created. The creative department is made up of teams of art directors and copywriters, with the art director creating the visual side of things and the copywriter the words, although the boundaries are often blurred these days.

The creative director oversees the creative output of an agency, they are also very good people to try and see but in the larger agencies they are generally very busy managing the creative team. The art directors are a really good contact to ‘get in with’.  If they like the way you see the world and your ideas it may well inspire them to create their next campaign with your work in mind. It’s all very much a collaborative and a people business, so networking with art directors often pays off for individual photographers.

L1001054

A few final words of advice:

• Don’t be put off if an art buyer books you in 4 months ahead, this is fairly normal.

• Try and book to see a few art directors (e.g 3 or 4), at say 15 minutes intervals as it’s likely some will cancel on the day as they suddenly have a pitch to work on. They aren’t being rude it’s just the way it is.

• Don’t be put off if you make 20 calls and send loads of emails and don’t get anywhere. It is part of an art buyer and art director’s job to see as many photographers as they can, so don’t think you are being a pain or wasting their time.

• Having said that, be respectful of peoples time and only show relevant, well edited and well presented work that is actually useful for the ad agency to see. Do your research before your meeting and familiarise yourself with their clients and recent work, everyone likes to talk about themselves!

• Don’t ever get shirty if your calls or emails don’t get acknowledged, if someone says they don’t want to make an appointment or gives you negative feedback. Sooner or later, if your photography is right for the brands an agency works for, your perseverance should pay off.

Good luck!

Please Note:

We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.

We reserve the right not to enter into on going correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Shooting Without a Location Permit

July 30, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Lisa

Dear Ask an Agent,

I’ve been asked by a regular client to do a shoot next week. They want me to cast the models before the shoot but rather than scout the locations, which will be cafes and shops, and get permissions beforehand they want me to just find them on the day. Do you think this will be ok?

Jerry Llewellyn

Hi Jerry,

Not really, no.  I think this is a really bad idea!

With any shoot that is going to be a potential hazard to the public you need to make arrangements before the day of the shoot for a number of reasons.

• As you will have a large crew in tow – models, stylist, hair & make-up, assistants, art director – plus wardrobe, props and kit, there is potential to cause damage to the location or even injury to the public. Dragging a clothing rail with wardrobe or your equipment across the floor might cause damage or a child might trip over your tripod and hurt themselves for example. To avoid this it’s wise to do a risk assessment before the day of the shoot and agree to have a section cordoned off for a set time period. Also, whoever is responsible for booking the location, which by the sounds of it could be you, needs to have at least 2 million pounds public liability insurance in place in the event that there is damage or injury.

maeveskitchen09

© Holly Pickering

• Not having the locations lined up before the shoot day may result in major delays to the schedule. Imagine how it might pan out on the day. Are your entire crew going to follow you around while you go into the various locations and try and find the right person to talk to? Chances are the only person with authority to grant permission and agree a location fee won’t be around on the day anyway. It can take a few days to negotiate a hire fee and grant proper written permissions once you’ve found somewhere. Delays usually have financial implications; overtime for the entire crew, additional expenses or even the cost of a potential re-shoot. You could be liable for these costs if you don’t do things properly.

• It’s usual on a commercial job to scout several locations so the client can have a choice and approve the one they think will work best. Chances are the senior client might not be on shoot and they will want to have their say when they see the final images – they might not like the location you and the art director have chosen, reject your images and refuse to pay you.

• Finally, it’s a matter of being professional. The shoot could end up being a complete shambles and the finger will be pointed at you. As a professional photographer it is your responsibility to adhere to industry codes of conduct and advise your client on the protocol. Aside from being made to look like a bit of an idiot who can’t arrange a shoot, you could ruin relationships with your crew, your regular client and even find yourself very much out of pocket.

I know no one likes say no to a client, but you really do need to shout up and explain why this is a bad idea sooner rather than later!

Please Note:

We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.

We reserve the right not to enter into on going correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Student Exploitation?

June 27, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Lisa

Dear Ask an Agent,

I’ve just been approached at my end of year show by a business who would like to commission me to shoot some images for their advertising. Whilst I find that very flattering, they are only offering minimal expenses (travel,subsistence etc) and no fee, should I at this stage of my career accept something like this? The end usage is quite extensive and includes packaging, brochures, point of sale and web, but not only that they actually want ‘outright ownership of images’. I’m worried if I say no I’ve blown my chances of having them as a future client.

A Photography Graduate 

Thanks for getting in touch about that and congrats on your photography degree. This is pretty cheeky and not really on.

Very occasionally it’s worth accepting a job for no fee, for example if it’s an amazing brief that’s perfect for your book, full shoot expenses are paid and there’s a really good reason why there is no fee ( maybe it’s a charity or a very good cause or a test shoot for an unlaunched company). It doesn’t sound like this is one of those occasions. Aside from that you should never assign ownership of images (see an earlier Ask an Agent on Copyright). And that old chestnut of the promise of more work in the future rarely comes off in my experience.

Reading between the lines someone in the marketing department has come up with what they probably think is a genius idea, ‘Hey I know what, we can headhunt graduate talent at the final degree shows, and they’ll be so excited and flattered to be given the opportunity to work with a big brand that they won’t want a fee, it’s a win win situation’.

AAA
© Andy Smith

Well the thing is, it’s unreasonable to the point of being exploitative. Even though you have only just graduated and may not have a long list of clients (yet!) your work still has a value, which is why they want it all over their marketing communications. I’m sure the marketing department aren’t working on this for free, neither are the graphic designers that have designed the packaging or the web developers, not to mention the printers who are printing the brochures or the point of sale material. And we haven’t even gone onto the fact that your amazing photography might end up being integral to their sales and profit, and they don’t feel that you should be paid?!

So I would advise you politely telling them how you intend to run your business professionally. Pointing out what is standard industry practice – to be paid a fee that reflects the usage and not to assign copyright. Inform them that you want to protect your business and integrity, establish a standard and only accept fee paying jobs. Offer to prepare a full and professional estimate for shoot fees including usage, plus all shoot and production expenses. And ask them how they would like to progress.

At best you may educate them, at worst you may need to walk away from a job that’s not worth doing and I’m sure there will be plenty more to come.

Keep me posted, but if any students are reading this in a similar situation, don’t sell your self short!

Please Note:

We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask An Agent / ‘Off The Shelf’ Photography

April 29, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

LisaASKanAgentsmaller

This month on Ask an Agent, a question that comes up now and again from our clients , so I thought it would be helpful to publish the answer by kind courtesy of Peter.

Dear Ask and Agent,

I need to get together a bank of images by the same photographer for a client of mine (I’m a freelance creative and they are a large media company). I don’t think they would have the budget to commission this time, although if the images work well they may be persuaded to next year. I don’t really want to go the photo library route as the images will all be by different photographers and won’t be consistent. Would it be possible to have access to one of you photographers back catalogues to choose a collection of images? I probably need about 50. I thought this might be a good middle ground and will give my client access to a photographic vibe that they can buy off the shelf and use to re-energise their visual cache.

Peter Robinson

Thanks very much for your question Peter. Although this is a nice idea in theory, in practice I’m afraid you might come up against a few barriers if you need to licence a large amount of existing imagery by the same photographer. (Although never say never and if you can give me a few more specifics, I can certainly have look; for example are you looking for more lifestyle, ‘real’ looking shots of people in real situations or something slightly more stylised/aspirational/filmic. Spontaneous moments or posed? Do you need people in the shots at all? What sort of locations are they in?).

PH © Patrick Harrison / British Gas

(more…)

LPA Portfolio Reviews

April 4, 2014

Would you like an honest appraisal of your photography and photography ‘brand’ by one of the industry’s leading experts? Each month Lisa Pritchard, founder of LPA, offers a limited amount of one to one sessions at the LPA HQ in central London.

Being a photographer can sometimes feel a bit insular and although you might get regular comments and advice about your work, sometimes its difficult to know which to take on board and which to take with a pinch of salt. Lisa can offer you some unbiased, no nonsense feed back based on years of experience. So, whether you’d just like a one hour general review, a serious editing job on your website, or a full brand and marketing overhaul now’s your chance. Please email hello@lisapritchard.com for a full menu, price list and availability.

“I set up LPA Portfolio Reviews nearly a year ago as a result of a huge demand from photographers of all levels asking if they could pop in for a chat about their work. I can only spare a certain amount of time but I thought it would be a good idea to set aside some time each month and offer formal review sessions. It’s often much easier for me to be subjective , identify weak ( and strong!) areas and give photographers a firm nudge in the right direction. I really enjoy the sessions and meeting so many different types of photographers, and the feedback about how useful the sessions are makes it even more rewarding”

Here’s what a few happy punters had to say…

Louise Adby

“I was so excited to discover that LPA offered portfolio reviews – I felt I really needed a honest review of my work, and with LPA representing some of the best lifestyle photographers in the industry I knew that Lisa would be able to help me move forward with my business. My meeting with Lisa couldn’t have been more inspirational and really helped with building my confidence to promote myself. I am currently in the process of getting my first printed portfolio assembled and I really can’t wait to start marketing myself more effectively. Thank you so much for your honest opinion and making me feel excited about my work. I will definitely be booking more reviews in the future.”

www.louiseadby.com

LA

‘Outside St Paul’s Cathedral London, for Pure Student Living’ © Louise Adby

Nathan Gallagher

“A visit to Lisa Pritchard Agency was exactly what I needed to help me progress as a photographer. I found their knowledge and experience invaluable and would recommend their service to anyone looking to take a photographic business forward. Nice biscuits too.”

www.nathangallagherphotography.com

NG

‘Charlotte Bradbury, Loughborough for Lloyds Banking Group’ © Nathan Gallagher (more…)

Ask An Agent / Can A Photographer Have Another Job?

March 28, 2014

LisaASKanAgentsmaller

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Dear Ask an Agent,

I wanted to ask you what you thought about a photographer having another job as well as being a photographer? I left University just over four years ago and since then have been assisting, retouching and doing the odd commission myself. I must admit I didn’t quite realise how difficult it would be to earn a decent living as a photographer and expected just to be doing my own photography by now. Will it always be like this? Should I keep striving to be a full time professional photographer or do you think in fact there is no shame in doing other jobs and should I accept that this is the way it will always be?

Anonymous photographer

Many thanks for your question. If it makes you feel any better there are many, many other aspiring and more established photographers in the same boat as you. Coming out of University and breaking into the industry is difficult enough and the on going, challenging economic climate doesn’t help.

But don’t feel despondent, it’s a brilliant industry to be in and there is no shame in having another ‘job’ whilst you build your career as a photographer or in fact decide that you quite like the security of having other paid work and want to continue to do this.

Ideally of course it’s preferable to combine a photography related vocation at least with being a photographer, enabling you to make contacts and get more valuable experience in the industry. Having said that, it probably needs to be a job with some flexibility, either freelance or part time would enable you to continue to build you own business.

Like any business I guess the only downside is that while you are taking on other work, you might end up spreading yourself too thinly and lack focus on building up your own photography business. At some point you probably will need to come to a decision. The way I see it is that you basically have three choices:

1) Find funding from elsewhere and throw your all into your own photography business, shooting personal work, marketing and networking. The more time, effort (and money is cleverly spent) you put into it, the quicker you’ll reach your goal. But then of course you need to be 100% confident that you have what it takes to succeed and most importantly can build a strong brand that the market will buy into.

2) Continue bringing in other revenue streams whilst you build up your career as a photographer. Just as you are with assisting and retouching.

3) Resign yourself to the fact that you won’t be able to make as much money as you want or need with just your own photography and put just as much importance on building up a compatible side-line. Again your retouching could work. It may be that this other ‘job’ might take over and you might end up taking a different career path than you first set out to do. But then again you may find a fabulous new revenue stream that will compliment and drive forward your photography career perfectly. It doesn’t have to be retouching, although it’s easier to play to your strengths and experience. I’ve met photographers who, aside from shooting their own commissions, shoot moving image and behind the scenes videos for other photographers; those that run workshops and teach; those that are location scouts and producers; some that also picture edit or write; and I was just reading the other day about a pet photographer who has also set up a dog modelling agency – the possibilities are multiple and varied!

Only you can decide.

Please Note:
We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.
We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.
We reserve the right not to answer all questions.
Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.
This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask An Agent / Photographing Kids

February 28, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

 LisaASKanAgent5

I’ve been asked to put some costs together for a shoot with babies and toddlers. I have some personal shots of kids in my folio but have never been commissioned by a client to photography them. Can you tell me the things I need to be aware of when organising a shoot with kids. The client is a supermarket and the shoot is through an advertising agency.

Rebecca Dixon, Photographer.

I can indeed, here at LPA we have done lots of shoots with children and there are some specific things that you need to bear in mind as it can be a minefield!

Children’s Performance Licences

A performance licence is required in the UK (and many other countries) when a child under the age of 16 is required to work on a shoot as a model. This is to protect the welfare of the child, for example to check that they are fit and healthy enough to work and are not working too many days in a given year.

You need to apply for the licence from the children’s employment officer at the borough council where the child lives. It isn’t expensive, is usually a straightforward procedure and the councils rarely reject the application. You should allow up to 10 days but be aware it can take up to 21 working days. You must take this paperwork to the shoot, we have been inspected several times! Not getting a licence can result in a hefty fine.

MN_Personal

© Michela Nale

KH_WhiteRose

© Kerry Harrison (more…)

Blog Feed

Back in the onset of Autumn our lovely LPA stylist Alice Timms teamed up with ...
18 Dec 2014