Archive for the ‘Ask An Agent’ Category

Ask An Agent / Agents Are Ignoring Me!

January 29, 2016

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column answering your questions about the business of photography– the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

We recently had this email in from a photographer who has been trying to get in touch with agents.

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© Andy Smith / For illustrative purposes only

Dear Ask an Agent,

I recently sent an email to ten different agents asking them what they thought of my work but didn’t receive a response from any of them. So I resent the email , still nothing. Finally I phoned them all and was just ‘fobbed’ off by whoever answered the phone in most cases or told that they would look out for the email. Is this normal?

Anonymous (Photographer)

Hi there,

I am just trying to work out what you kind of response you were expecting ? Us agents are usually very busy, often juggling several things at a time with a whole load of deadlines and demands to meet and our own roster of photographers and clients are the priority. We also often get several emails a day from photographers like yourself. So if you are simply wanting a free critique of your work then the cynical side of me would say I’m not surpised you haven’t heard anything! Having said that you might catch one of us at the right time and if your work really stands out, I’m sure at some point you might receive a response with some positive feedback.

If you are, however, expecting one of the agents to respond with an interest in representing you , they are only likely to respond if all of the following criteria are fulfilled:

a) Your work is strong and relevant to their client base.
b) They personally like your style of work  (we have different tastes!)
c)  The agent happens to be looking to take more photographers on at the time.
d) You fit with their current roster.

And many will be looking for …

e) An already well established client base and proven track record.

If it is an agent you are looking for rather than just an opinion on your work,  I would also suggest you get to the point and say this, but do also quantify why you think you would be a good match, what you can bring to the show and what you like about their agency.

Bagging an agent may well take more than a couple of emails and a phone call; often we take photographers on whom we have gradually built a relationship up with, maybe we’ve met them at an event and then built up a relationship over social media for example. Having said that, just yesterday we responded to an email from a photographer and asked him to come in to meet us as we liked the look of his work – it is our job to be aware of whose around – so it’s not all bad news!

Whether you’re a creative director or a student, a photographer or a designer, an art buyer or an assistant, if you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com and we’ll answer as many as we can!

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions sent to Ask an Agent.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. This is the personal opinion of Lisa Pritchard and she cannot speak for all other agents, but from discussions over the years, she has a pretty good idea that most of them will agree!

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

 

Interview With Production Paradise

January 20, 2016

Just before Christmas Lisa was interviewed by Production Paradise to discuss photography, her career and ways to get more work.

Filmed here at Camden Park Studios, Lisa spoke to the Production Paradise team for a short video. Definitely worth a watch if you’re after tips for the year ahead.

Ask an Agent / Tips for 2016

December 18, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column answering your questions about the business of photography– the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

As 2015 draws to an end, I’ve come up with some ideas that will hopefully keep you inspired throughout the new year ahead.

LisaSanta

Dear Ask an Agent

I’m a photographer shooting mostly for advertising and design agencies. I’m currently planning ahead for the New Year and wondered if you could give some tips to stay motivated and increase my chances of success?

– Henry Ash

Thanks for the question Henry. It can be tricky staying motivated as a freelance photographer sometimes, especially through the dark winter months. But here’s a few tips that will hopefully help.

– Keep shooting personal work. This will strengthen your brand and help you stay on track. Photographers who lose motivation seem to be the ones who aren’t inspired by what they are commissioned to shoot anymore. But clients will only commission you based on your portfolio of work.

– Set some realistic goals for 2016 and stick to them. Whether it’s showing your portfolio to a certain amount of agencies, improving your website or maintaining a work/life balance, you’ll not only feel a sense of achievement but it should all contribute towards a fulfilling and successful business.

– Get as much feedback as you can about your work, whether it’s from a creative, an art buyer or an actual portfolio review. Not all the advice you get will be a game changer but you’re bound to pick up some helpful pearls of wisdom that might really make a difference.

– Go to some industry events and engage with others over social media. You might sometimes feel a bit isolated as a photographer and meeting other like minded people should keep you inspired and informed. (But don’t spend the majority of your day tweeting!)

– ‘Do good work for nice people.’ I admit I nicked this one from an image I saw recently , but I love it and there’s definitely something in it! ( thanks to Paul Craig, Raw and the person that came up with the phrase, apologies I couldn’t find the source)

Merry Christmas from Ask an Agent and I look forward to answering all your questions next year!

DoGood
© Paul Craig – image taken at Manchester based creative agency, Raw.

Whether you’re a creative director or a student, a photographer or a designer, an art buyer or an assistant, if you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com and we’ll answer as many as we can!

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions sent to Ask an Agent.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Extra Fees for Night Shoots.

November 30, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column answering your questions about the business of photography– the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

This month we’re looking at shooting for overseas clients.

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Dear Ask an Agent,

A advertising agency client of mine has asked if I can shoot from midnight to 8 a.m in the morning for an upcoming x 3 day commission. Their client is based in Malaysia and want to be in contact and approve shots as the shoot is happening. So my question is, should I charge extra for this?

– Peter Wood

Thanks for your question, in general it is usually expected that a photographers fee will be more for shooting in ‘anti-social hours’. We actually have the following clause built into our terms and conditions:

ANTI-SOCIAL HOURS. A normal working day is 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. and any time before or after these hours may be classed as anti-social hours. Photographer’s fees after 6 p.m. but before 10 p.m. will be 1. 5 times the photographers agreed daily fee including usage. Photographer’s fees after 10 p.m. and up until 8 a.m. will be charged at twice the photographers agreed daily fee including usage. Third party fees will be as their terms impose

TIMEZONE
© Julian Love / Shooting at night for Canon (for illustration purposes only)

So yes I think it’s perfectly fair to charge extra for working the night shift! If you are responsible for any crew- assistants, models, stylists and so forth- don’t forget to check what their ‘anti-social’ fees are, as well as any location or studio hire additional costs.

Having said that, take each job as it comes and do what is fair and reasonable, it may be a very long standing client who is paying you a handsome usage fee, in which case you might want to be reasonable and not charge extra (although the rest of the crew might not agree to work for their usual rates which is fair enough). However, it might also be the case that the whole shoot doesn’t need to be in the dead of night and the client might be able to approve the shots in their own working hours after each shoot day – don’t be afraid to ask these questions, you might even save them some money.

Whether you’re a creative director or a student, a photographer or a designer, an art buyer or an assistant, if you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com and we’ll answer as many as we can!

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions sent to Ask an Agent.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / ‘Real’ Models

October 29, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column answering your questions about the business of photography– the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

This month we have a question on what the term ‘real’ looking models actually means!

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Dear Ask an Agent,

I know you do a lot of production as well as just being an agent, so I wondered if you could help me with something.

I’m doing a casting online for ‘real’ looking models for a shoot, but the client keeps rejecting all the models I send over. I’ve briefed the model agencies to only send ‘real’ looking people, so I don’t know why the client doesn’t like any of them.

– Lucy Bones

Hi Lucy,

Ah yes, this sounds familiar, many of the shoots we organise require ‘real’ looking models.

The problem is, there are a few different interpretations of ‘real’ in the commercial world, you’ll need to pin down what your client has in mind so expectations are met.

Basically there are two ends of the ‘real’ scale, when we are talking about castings for commercial shoots. At one end is your average looking person, perhaps even with some ‘quirks’. (I’m not going to attempt to give examples!) Then the other end of the scale is your very attractive type, but in no way pouty, posy, or unapproachable. A lot of shoots do require this latter end of the scale, as if you think about it, the images and the people in them need to look appealing so they will engage the consumer and sell stuff.

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© Nick David – an example of what I’d class as ‘real’ models from an advertising point of view – attractive but attainable.

Best thing to do if your client hasn’t made it clear, is to send them over some examples of models from the agencies who run the gamut of ‘real’. Then hopefully they can identify some that would fit the bill and why they like them. Do point out these are just examples for reference though, and that you haven’t checked their availability or fees, else they might lock on to someone if they like them.

Thanks for writing in to Ask an Agent and I hope your client finds what they are looking for!

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions sent to Ask an Agent.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

 

Ask an Agent / Are My Images Being Used Out of Licence?

October 2, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column answering your questions about the business of photography– the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

This month we have an interesting question about a client using images out of the agreed usage licence!

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“I did a shoot last year for a high street bank, with the final images being used in brochures and leaflets. The usage that the client actually asked for was printed literature, worldwide, 2 years. I’ve just noticed now though, that there are images of the brochures on the client’s website, with my images clearly on show. Do you think this is additional usage or included in the original usage? I have stated just this usage on the estimate and invoice and my terms do state that any additional usage needs to be negotiated.

– Chris Abbott

Thanks for your question Chris.

You’re right to question this and now you can see why it’s important to state clearly the usage on all correspondence and have business terms that cover you for things like this, so well done on that front!

Although the images are appearing online in the context of the printed publication, this is still considered as online usage. Online is a separate media to printed literature and therefore not covered by the existing usage licence.

Essentially the client are benefitting and potentially profiting from the use of your images in a different media than that in the original agreement. And it is good business practice to extend the licence for an additional fee.

To use a different example, let’s say you shot an image for a tin of cat food and granted the client a usage licence for packaging only. Then, the tin of cat food, with your image on it, featured in an ad on the telly. TV is a different media and not covered in the original usage licence. It is also a media that reaches a far wider audience than just packaging, just like online does compared to printed literature.

So going back to your situation, by using the images online, your client is in fact in breach of copyright. Having said that, it’s quite possible that they’re unaware they’ve done anything wrong so it’s best to be sensitive to this. Keep it light at this stage, firm but not accusatory or confrontational, so as to preserve the relationship with your client. Explain the infringement to them, by email or initially on the phone if you find that easier, and try to get some more information so you can quote a fair rate and get the ‘paperwork’ in order. How long have they been using the images online and how long do they want to continue to use them for are the key questions. Also if models were involved then be sure to pin down additional fees for this too and pass these on to your client.

Good luck!

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions sent to Ask an Agent.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Employer’s Liability Insurance / With Guest Blogger Tom Carson

September 4, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column answering your questions about the business of photography– the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

For this month’s Ask an Agent we tackle a great question from a young photographer wanting to know who exactly Employer’s Liability insurance is needed for.

“I’m a young lifestyle photographer and after a few years of assisting I’m beginning to pick up my own commissions. I’ve heard that it’s a legal requirement to have Employer’s Liability cover for anyone you employ. Could you explain who this covers? Do I need it for all crew involved in a shoot such as models, assistants, stylists, location managers and set builders or are there certain people it’s not applicable for?”

Izzy Russell

Thanks for your question Izzy. Insurance is a serious matter and so I’ve asked Tom Carson from the UK’s leading insurance brokers for the photographic industry, Williamson Carson, to answer your question. Here’s what he has to say…

Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 10.46.58 copy

“You’re right that it’s a legal requirement to have Employer’s Liability cover for anyone you legally and contractually employ. However the definition of an ‘employee’ in this case is often unclear, which may cause confusion. Generally there are two types of employment contract – labour only sub-contractors and bona-fide sub-contractors. Whether they are considered an employee and therefore whether you need Employer’s Liability insurance for a person depends on which category they fall under.

A labour only sub-contractor is generally understood to be anyone working under your ‘care, instruction and control,’ whether or not a fee is being paid. This includes photography assistants, models, volunteers, work experience people and friends and family helping you – essentially anyone who requires your direction to fulfill their role. A lot of photographers feel they don’t require this cover as they don’t employ anyone on a permanent basis, 
but as labour only sub-contractors are under your control they are legally considered to be employees and you need to have Employers Liability for them.
 


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A bona-fide sub-contractor is anyone working under their own direction rather than yours and charging a fee for their professional services. For example you mentioned stylists, location managers and set builders. These people don’t rely on your direction to fulfill their role in the shoot and therefore are not considered to be an employee. People such as hair & make-up artists, caterers, model makers and so on would also be considered as bona-fide sub-contractors. You don’t need Employer’s Liability insurance for these members of crew, but they should have their own in place.

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An Employer’s Liability policy will cover you on a worldwide basis for UK Nationals you employ. However because of such things as local laws, benefits and so forth, if you employ a foreign national in their own country you will need an Employer’s Liability policy in that country. So for example if you employ an Italian in Italy you will require an Italian Employer’s Liability. An exception to this is if you’re not the person responsible for contractually employing and paying the crew, for example when working with a producer or production company. In this instance, they will be responsible for taking out Employer’s Liability insurance.”

Thanks Tom! If anyone has any further questions please do comment below.

Williamson Carson & Co Ltd was formed in 1986 by John Williamson and Tom Carson and is the leading Insurance Broker for the photography industry in the UK. Williamson Carson and Co Ltd have been the appointed brokers for the Association of Photographers (AOP) for 20 years. Williamson Carson are also sponsors of our LPA Futures competition, generously offering our winners £250 towards camera insurance.

Whether you’re a creative director or a student, a photographer or a designer, an art buyer or an assistant, if you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Model Releases for Book Publishing / With Guest Blogger ‘Super Lawyer’ Charles Swan

August 3, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column tackling all your dilemmas about the photography industry – the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

Lisa was recently invited to critique the work of this year’s talented LCC BA Photography graduates. One of the graduates, Harry Conway, has shot a fantastic project titled ‘Stolen Souls’ for which he took real people by surprise on the streets of London at night. Harry had a question for Lisa about publishing the images without a model release, which we thought would be perfect for this month’s Ask an Agent.

“My name is Harry Conway and I have just graduated with a BA in Photography from the London College of Communication. I have compiled a photo book of photographs taken without the permission of the subjects (strangers in the street) called Stolen Souls. I want to approach publishers in the hope of getting the book out there. I know that photographs taken without permission in the street is legal in the UK, but I’m not sure of the legality of publishing these photographs and therefore making money from it”.

Harry Conway, Photographer

W: harryfconway.com

I: @harryfconway

Whilst we know you definitely need to obtain a model releases for commercial use, and we are pretty sure if the image just supports a narrative editorially, that’s ok, but we weren’t 100% about publishing a project specifically. So we turned to  Charles Swan,  one of the UK’s top media lawyers and partner at Swan Turton, to shed a bit more light on the matter. Here’s what he had to say…

Charlie Informal No 2Charles Swan from Swan Turton

“Yes, it is normally legal to photograph people in the streets. Yes, it is normally legal to publish those photographs in an editorial context in the UK (although the position varies in other countries). However, publishers are cautious people and may in practice be unwilling to publish the photographs without model releases, in case of legal claims (the law is rarely black and white). If they do agree to publish, this would probably be with a contract in which the photographer indemnifies the publisher against any legal claims. So Harry may find it difficult to find a publisher.”

1© Harry Conway

2© Harry Conway

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© Harry Conway

Whether you’re a creative director or a student, a photographer or a designer, an art buyer or an assistant, if you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Hair & Make-up for ‘Real People’

June 26, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column tackling all your dilemmas about the photography industry – the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

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This month we have a great question from a freelance designer about using a hair & make-up artist on shoots when a very natural look is required.

Dear Ask an Agent,

I need to commission photography for an annual report of several employees. I have got a few quotes in from photographers, some of which include a hair and make-up artist. I don’t want the employees to look over made up though, what’s your take on this? I know a lot of your photographers shoot some very natural images and that you also represent hair and make-up artists. Is it a good idea to have one on a shoot?

Brian Philips. Freelance Designer.

Hi Brian,

Thanks for your question. Nice to have one from a designer. This comes up a lot actually on these kinds of shoots and a lot of people share your concern. When commissioning photography of ‘real people’, and not professional models, the brief is usually to keep everything natural. Some clients even specifically request ‘no hair and make-up’ thinking this will help make the end result more authentic. However, the opposite can often be the case!

In our experience, when people know they are having their picture taken they turn up to work all dolled up, perhaps even after a trip to the hairdressers and looking nothing like they would do at work normally! The job of our hair and make-up artists is often to to ‘de-glam’ the subjects and start again.

Screen Shot 2015-06-26 at 16.46.12© Patrick Harrison / Hair & make-up by Claire Portman

The key is to get the right hair and make-up artist and brief them correctly. Our division LPA Style represents some great artists who have tonnes of experience making people look ‘everyday’. I would wholly recommend you do retain this option on your shoot if budget allows.

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions sent to Ask an Agent.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask an Agent / Advertising Agency Hit List

June 1, 2015

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column tackling all your dilemmas about the photography industry – the photography industry’s first Agony Aunt!

If you have any questions you’d like to ask a photographers agent please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. Questions can be on anything to do with the photography business, such as photoshoots, marketing, professional practice, pricing, contracts, legal stuff – anything!

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This month we have a question from a photographer about targeting both email and printed mailers to the right person at advertising agencies.

Hi Ask an Agent, 

First off ‘Ask an Agent’ is brilliant and a constant source of advice and inspiration. Thanks. I have a question regarding Email marketing, and to some extent physical marketing.

I’m sending out emails and physical mailers each quarter, or so, with a varying degree of success. Some have resulted in face to face meetings, some (I expect) have landed in the physical or digital bin! I’m constantly trying to hone my technique and method of marketing, one area I struggle with is who to contact.

I’ve noticed that a lot of Advertising agencies employ multiple people in the art buying department/process, for example: Head of Art Buying, Assistant Art Buyer, Junior Art Buyer, Art Buyer & Creative Producer, Senior Project Manager and Project Manager. When sending out emailers I’m conscious to avoid ‘blast’ emailing an entire team with the same email and come across as lazy, yet I still want to get it to the right person and engage with them in someway.

With so many people involved in the art buying process it’s difficult knowing who is the right person to contact. Can you shed any light on your experiences with this issue? Is it worth contacting everyone or targeting it to a specific person, and if so any advice on who is best to contact?

Many thanks,

Mark Salmon, Photographer.

Thanks for your kind words and your question Mark. You are right to be conscious of trying to engage with potential buyers on a more personal level, however, a huge ‘blast’ of emailers can also be effective. I know that sounds like a bit of a contradiction, but firstly, it can sometimes be very difficult to identify who is more likely to commission you above someone else, and secondly, it also depends on what you are sending.

The roles you have mentioned are all relevant people within advertising agencies who are integral to sourcing photographers. You can in fact add to that a plethora of other job titles- creative service director, art producer, senior creative producer, head of print, print producer, creative resources manager, project director, and let’s not forget art director, head of art, creative head and creative director ! The list goes on and new positions are being developed all the time. Different agencies have different structures, and even someone with the same job title might have varying degrees of responsibility in the commissioning process from one agency to the next. A junior art buyer in one agency, for example, might only be responsible for stock searches, whereas in another might be highly influential in sourcing talent to commission. So, you see, it can be extremely tricky to pin point the best person.

When sending out physical mailers, aside from the cost issue, I would advise sending them only to a very targeted list and certainly not to every person in the art buying or creative resource department. If possible send your printed promotion to those who have shown an interest in your work, whose agency seem really relevant or who you know commission photography like yours. Failing this send to the head of art buying or the most senior person. Most art buyers sit in the same room and share what has arrived in the post, pin it on the wall or have a central filing system. There’s a team of 6 of us here at LPA, for example and from personal experience, it just seems a bit odd, not to mention a waste of money when 6 or more identical mailers from photographers, model agencies or other suppliers turn up in the post on the same day.

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Julian Love/ Printed Mailer

Digital promotion is slightly different and I think a 2 tiered approach is called for here. Again, it’s a very good idea to target certain people and make them feel like they’ve been singled out, and I also think it’s crucial to build on previous communications as part of an overall marketing strategy and to nurture relationships. But, in my experience a ‘blast’ can certainly also bring in lots of commissions. There are potentially thousands of people in advertising agencies who are worth contacting (and that’s just in the UK) , mostly who hold the positions mentioned above. As you may know you can buy an off the shelf database that is updated every few months, from places such as Bikinilists.com and Filefx.co.uk. You can also enlist the services of bespoke email service providers, like our team at Image Access who work with Magic Mail, enabling you to send out bulk emails and monitor who has looked at your emailers. As Mike Laye from Image Access points out, ‘it’s NOT a good idea to send out large amounts of emails from your own regular account – you’re likely to get blocked as a source of “spam”!’

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LPA/ Digital Mailer

In my experience both a personal approach and a ‘blast’ bring in more work. We are constantly building on a tailor made database of contacts, so we send emailers (and printed promos) out to contacts with whom we have an existing relationships and target particularly relevant agencies with certain accounts (food and drink or sports for example) But we certainly also adopt a more scattergun approach for general updates of work which enable us to consistently reach out to new agencies and contacts.

Of course who to see is only the tip of the iceberg when talking about email marketing etiquette and effectiveness. The content, quality, consistency, frequency and timing are equally important. And most importantly, this direct marketing approach should be integrated into a bigger strategy to build the visibility of your brand. I remember an art buyer moaning to me once that they received so many emailers from someone, another agent actually, but that this other agent never bothered to call them or try and arrange a meeting with them. These art buyers can be difficult to please sometimes, but they had a point!

Please Note:

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only.

Lisa Pritchard, LPA and guest bloggers take no responsibility for any omissions or errors.

Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

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