Archive for the ‘Ask An Agent’ Category

Ask an Agent / Student Exploitation?

June 27, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Lisa

Dear Ask an Agent,

I’ve just been approached at my end of year show by a business who would like to commission me to shoot some images for their advertising. Whilst I find that very flattering, they are only offering minimal expenses (travel,subsistence etc) and no fee, should I at this stage of my career accept something like this? The end usage is quite extensive and includes packaging, brochures, point of sale and web, but not only that they actually want ‘outright ownership of images’. I’m worried if I say no I’ve blown my chances of having them as a future client.

A Photography Graduate 

Thanks for getting in touch about that and congrats on your photography degree. This is pretty cheeky and not really on.

Very occasionally it’s worth accepting a job for no fee, for example if it’s an amazing brief that’s perfect for your book, full shoot expenses are paid and there’s a really good reason why there is no fee ( maybe it’s a charity or a very good cause or a test shoot for an unlaunched company). It doesn’t sound like this is one of those occasions. Aside from that you should never assign ownership of images (see an earlier Ask an Agent on Copyright). And that old chestnut of the promise of more work in the future rarely comes off in my experience.

Reading between the lines someone in the marketing department has come up with what they probably think is a genius idea, ‘Hey I know what, we can headhunt graduate talent at the final degree shows, and they’ll be so excited and flattered to be given the opportunity to work with a big brand that they won’t want a fee, it’s a win win situation’.

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© Andy Smith

Well the thing is, it’s unreasonable to the point of being exploitative. Even though you have only just graduated and may not have a long list of clients (yet!) your work still has a value, which is why they want it all over their marketing communications. I’m sure the marketing department aren’t working on this for free, neither are the graphic designers that have designed the packaging or the web developers, not to mention the printers who are printing the brochures or the point of sale material. And we haven’t even gone onto the fact that your amazing photography might end up being integral to their sales and profit, and they don’t feel that you should be paid?!

So I would advise you politely telling them how you intend to run your business professionally. Pointing out what is standard industry practice – to be paid a fee that reflects the usage and not to assign copyright. Inform them that you want to protect your business and integrity, establish a standard and only accept fee paying jobs. Offer to prepare a full and professional estimate for shoot fees including usage, plus all shoot and production expenses. And ask them how they would like to progress.

At best you may educate them, at worst you may need to walk away from a job that’s not worth doing and I’m sure there will be plenty more to come.

Keep me posted, but if any students are reading this in a similar situation, don’t sell your self short!

Please Note:

We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask An Agent / ‘Off The Shelf’ Photography

April 29, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

LisaASKanAgentsmaller

This month on Ask an Agent, a question that comes up now and again from our clients , so I thought it would be helpful to publish the answer by kind courtesy of Peter.

Dear Ask and Agent,

I need to get together a bank of images by the same photographer for a client of mine (I’m a freelance creative and they are a large media company). I don’t think they would have the budget to commission this time, although if the images work well they may be persuaded to next year. I don’t really want to go the photo library route as the images will all be by different photographers and won’t be consistent. Would it be possible to have access to one of you photographers back catalogues to choose a collection of images? I probably need about 50. I thought this might be a good middle ground and will give my client access to a photographic vibe that they can buy off the shelf and use to re-energise their visual cache.

Peter Robinson

Thanks very much for your question Peter. Although this is a nice idea in theory, in practice I’m afraid you might come up against a few barriers if you need to licence a large amount of existing imagery by the same photographer. (Although never say never and if you can give me a few more specifics, I can certainly have look; for example are you looking for more lifestyle, ‘real’ looking shots of people in real situations or something slightly more stylised/aspirational/filmic. Spontaneous moments or posed? Do you need people in the shots at all? What sort of locations are they in?).

PH © Patrick Harrison / British Gas

(more…)

LPA Portfolio Reviews

April 4, 2014

Would you like an honest appraisal of your photography and photography ‘brand’ by one of the industry’s leading experts? Each month Lisa Pritchard, founder of LPA, offers a limited amount of one to one sessions at the LPA HQ in central London.

Being a photographer can sometimes feel a bit insular and although you might get regular comments and advice about your work, sometimes its difficult to know which to take on board and which to take with a pinch of salt. Lisa can offer you some unbiased, no nonsense feed back based on years of experience. So, whether you’d just like a one hour general review, a serious editing job on your website, or a full brand and marketing overhaul now’s your chance. Please email hello@lisapritchard.com for a full menu, price list and availability.

“I set up LPA Portfolio Reviews nearly a year ago as a result of a huge demand from photographers of all levels asking if they could pop in for a chat about their work. I can only spare a certain amount of time but I thought it would be a good idea to set aside some time each month and offer formal review sessions. It’s often much easier for me to be subjective , identify weak ( and strong!) areas and give photographers a firm nudge in the right direction. I really enjoy the sessions and meeting so many different types of photographers, and the feedback about how useful the sessions are makes it even more rewarding”

Here’s what a few happy punters had to say…

Louise Adby

“I was so excited to discover that LPA offered portfolio reviews – I felt I really needed a honest review of my work, and with LPA representing some of the best lifestyle photographers in the industry I knew that Lisa would be able to help me move forward with my business. My meeting with Lisa couldn’t have been more inspirational and really helped with building my confidence to promote myself. I am currently in the process of getting my first printed portfolio assembled and I really can’t wait to start marketing myself more effectively. Thank you so much for your honest opinion and making me feel excited about my work. I will definitely be booking more reviews in the future.”

www.louiseadby.com

LA

‘Outside St Paul’s Cathedral London, for Pure Student Living’ © Louise Adby

Nathan Gallagher

“A visit to Lisa Pritchard Agency was exactly what I needed to help me progress as a photographer. I found their knowledge and experience invaluable and would recommend their service to anyone looking to take a photographic business forward. Nice biscuits too.”

www.nathangallagherphotography.com

NG

‘Charlotte Bradbury, Loughborough for Lloyds Banking Group’ © Nathan Gallagher (more…)

Ask An Agent / Can A Photographer Have Another Job?

March 28, 2014

LisaASKanAgentsmaller

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Dear Ask an Agent,

I wanted to ask you what you thought about a photographer having another job as well as being a photographer? I left University just over four years ago and since then have been assisting, retouching and doing the odd commission myself. I must admit I didn’t quite realise how difficult it would be to earn a decent living as a photographer and expected just to be doing my own photography by now. Will it always be like this? Should I keep striving to be a full time professional photographer or do you think in fact there is no shame in doing other jobs and should I accept that this is the way it will always be?

Anonymous photographer

Many thanks for your question. If it makes you feel any better there are many, many other aspiring and more established photographers in the same boat as you. Coming out of University and breaking into the industry is difficult enough and the on going, challenging economic climate doesn’t help.

But don’t feel despondent, it’s a brilliant industry to be in and there is no shame in having another ‘job’ whilst you build your career as a photographer or in fact decide that you quite like the security of having other paid work and want to continue to do this.

Ideally of course it’s preferable to combine a photography related vocation at least with being a photographer, enabling you to make contacts and get more valuable experience in the industry. Having said that, it probably needs to be a job with some flexibility, either freelance or part time would enable you to continue to build you own business.

Like any business I guess the only downside is that while you are taking on other work, you might end up spreading yourself too thinly and lack focus on building up your own photography business. At some point you probably will need to come to a decision. The way I see it is that you basically have three choices:

1) Find funding from elsewhere and throw your all into your own photography business, shooting personal work, marketing and networking. The more time, effort (and money is cleverly spent) you put into it, the quicker you’ll reach your goal. But then of course you need to be 100% confident that you have what it takes to succeed and most importantly can build a strong brand that the market will buy into.

2) Continue bringing in other revenue streams whilst you build up your career as a photographer. Just as you are with assisting and retouching.

3) Resign yourself to the fact that you won’t be able to make as much money as you want or need with just your own photography and put just as much importance on building up a compatible side-line. Again your retouching could work. It may be that this other ‘job’ might take over and you might end up taking a different career path than you first set out to do. But then again you may find a fabulous new revenue stream that will compliment and drive forward your photography career perfectly. It doesn’t have to be retouching, although it’s easier to play to your strengths and experience. I’ve met photographers who, aside from shooting their own commissions, shoot moving image and behind the scenes videos for other photographers; those that run workshops and teach; those that are location scouts and producers; some that also picture edit or write; and I was just reading the other day about a pet photographer who has also set up a dog modelling agency – the possibilities are multiple and varied!

Only you can decide.

Please Note:
We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.
We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.
We reserve the right not to answer all questions.
Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.
This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

Ask An Agent / Photographing Kids

February 28, 2014

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

 LisaASKanAgent5

I’ve been asked to put some costs together for a shoot with babies and toddlers. I have some personal shots of kids in my folio but have never been commissioned by a client to photography them. Can you tell me the things I need to be aware of when organising a shoot with kids. The client is a supermarket and the shoot is through an advertising agency.

Rebecca Dixon, Photographer.

I can indeed, here at LPA we have done lots of shoots with children and there are some specific things that you need to bear in mind as it can be a minefield!

Children’s Performance Licences

A performance licence is required in the UK (and many other countries) when a child under the age of 16 is required to work on a shoot as a model. This is to protect the welfare of the child, for example to check that they are fit and healthy enough to work and are not working too many days in a given year.

You need to apply for the licence from the children’s employment officer at the borough council where the child lives. It isn’t expensive, is usually a straightforward procedure and the councils rarely reject the application. You should allow up to 10 days but be aware it can take up to 21 working days. You must take this paperwork to the shoot, we have been inspected several times! Not getting a licence can result in a hefty fine.

MN_Personal

© Michela Nale

KH_WhiteRose

© Kerry Harrison (more…)

Ask An Agent / Photographers Dining Club Special / Getting Commissioned

January 31, 2014

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© Chris Brock / Lisa chatting with Christine de Blangy and Harry Borden


Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

Lisa recently hosted a panel discussion at recent venture Photographers Dining Club on the subject of Getting Commissioned. The panel included influential commissioners Christine De Blangy from Leo Burnett, Daniel Moorey from Adam and Eve DDB and Emma Bowkett from FT Weekend Magazine plus legendary photographers Harry Borden, David Stewart and Chris Floyd. This month, in an Ask an Agent special, we bring you an agent’s perspective on the questions tackled.

What do you think is the most effective approach to getting commissioned?

a) Approaching clients directly with fully formed ideas the client just needs to find space and budget for.
b) Approaching clients directly with your portfolio and letting them know you’re available for commissions of their choice.
c) Putting work out there through your own channels and waiting for clients to contact you.

Andy Waterman

I’ve always maintained that getting commissioned is rarely a result of a one off marketing tactic. I read somewhere once that you need to make contact with a potential customer seven times before even registering in their consciousness; whether that includes a folio meeting, a really cool mailshot or a top ranking place when you are googled it doesn’t really matter.

To get commissioned you need to remain in the back of the minds of potential commissioners at all times, and you can utilise a variety of methods to do this. Having said this, it’s not just about a tactical, consistent marketing approach. You can be reaching your potential commissioners constantly with your images, whether or not they connect and remember those images and whether or not they are then encouraged to commission you is a different matter. It’s a waste of time if the images don’t make the right impression.

In fact, it always surprises me how many successful photographers don’t seem to have a formal marketing plan, they appear to go from one commission to the next almost by luck, and this was confirmed to a certain extent by the photographers talks at the recent Photographers Dining Club. But what did occur to me is that these types of photographers have something in common. They consistently create great images that have impact and they are passionate and driven about their work, and I reckon this is what creates the luck (and therefore the commissions!)

So, my answer would be a combination of a), b) and c) at the very least but it only works if you produce consistently strong images and are passionate about your work.

AskAnAgent4

© Rowan Fee
A personal project by Rowan (the boots on the left) which inspired agency Kitcatt Nohr Digitas to commission him to shoot this Nikon camera in a similar way for John Lewis


To specialise or not. When viewing a folio would you like to see a variety of work or only the most relevant images?

Travis Hodges

3rd

Above: Example of a portfolio bound by Delta Design (more…)

Ask an Agent / Christmas in Summer!?

December 18, 2013

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com. 

_NIC7496A-SANTA

I noticed on Twitter that you’ve been shooting a Christmas themed shoot over the past week – how on earth do you do that in this weather?!
Chloe Whitehouse

Thanks for your question Chloe ( and thanks Tom for my lovely beard!) I’ve been saving this one for my annual festive themed ‘Ask an Agent’! The shoot you’re referring to was for Coca-Cola, shot by Nick Daly in the middle of the heat wave this summer. It must have been 35C when the team were having to get  estive with roast turkeys, Christmas trees and presents! In addition to Coca-Cola, we’ve also shot ‘Christmas’ in the summer for clients such as Boots and Harvester – we even did Halloween in January! We asked supremely talented LPA stylist Alice Timms how she makes it look like Christmas whatever time of the year it is.

IMG_5143
Alice Timms and Ros Keep (in sandals!) decorating a tree on set for the Boots Christmas catalogue.

Much of the Christmas shoot styling for advertising is done in July, which can bring quite a unique set of challenges. One of the main challenge is getting hold of all the decorations so far away from Christmas, so this requires a bit of forward planning and a  good knowledge of where to go.

There are props houses that stock a selection, but you can’t just rely on these, so luckily there are specific shops that specialise in Christmas all year round. I have also been buying up decorations in the January sales for a while so have built up a good selection now of my own which I can use. It encourages you to be more creative and I have also made decorations from items available in haberdashery shops all year round, such as tassels and sequins. Paper wedding decorations also work well, and wrapping paper makes good paper chains.

IMG_5127
Alice and her home-made paper chains.

Christmas trees can be quite tricky to source in July, so I have a couple of back up fake trees at home, but if we need a real one then I have used a Christmas tree farm up in the far north of Scotland. The tree had to be cut at midnight the evening before the shoot and couriered down overnight. The problem in July is that the trees get lots of new growth which is a different colour so it needs trimming and lots and lots of water, as they don’t like the heat. It needs to be kept outside in the shade until the last minute when you need to dress it, and then you have to be careful as the branches are too floppy to hold decorations that are too heavy. Tree branches with fairy lights also make good out of focus backgrounds.

IMG_5110
Getting that troublesome tree to look its best!

It might be 35 degrees and a heatwave, so I am used to decorating trees in my sandals now, we put on Christmas hats and listen to some jingle bells and get into the festive spirit. By the time Christmas really comes around , I have set it up already on 5 shoots so I leave it to my children to decorate our tree at home!

Thanks for that Alice! From a production point of view, we’ve covered everything from getting fake snow in the summer to arranging holiday shoots in the thick of winter – we know how to get the results whatever the weather or season!

Hopefully this has been helpful – make sure stay tuned for lots more handy tips and advice in 2014 – Merry Christmas to you all!

Ask an Agent / How to Impress an Agent

December 2, 2013


Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

LisaASKanAgent5


I am a freelance photographer currently looking to join a photographic agency to further engage more work, clients and reputation.
What advice would you give to a photographer at an agency interview? The Do’s and Dont’s? Is there a particular body of work that agencies look for? The story behind the work? A particular quality to suit the agency?

Looking at my website below would you be interested in my
work? www.rebecca-andrews.co.uk

Thank you,

Rebecca Andrews.

Thanks for your question Rebecca. I’ll give you a list of do’s and don’ts for a meeting with an agent in a moment, but generally speaking if you’ve got that far you’ve probably ticked many of the boxes already. Us agents are contacted several times a day by photographers seeking representation. There are thousands of photographers and only a handful of agents in comparison. So if an agent agrees to have a meeting this means they are seriously interested in representing you.

The reality is that a lot of agents generally only take on photographers that they feel they can fairly easily secure commercial work for. The things they are going to be looking for are a proven track record, an established client list and a strong signature style or identity. If a photographer looks like they are consistently working for advertising and design agencies and winning awards, they have probably got a pretty strong chance of getting an agent. It’s not just the financial gain that makes them an attractive option, representing a photographer who already has an understanding of how the industry works plus realistic expectations really helps and this usually comes with experience. Having said that some agents will take on photographers with fewer credentials if they really like the work, can see the potential and are prepared to invest time and money in the short term.

Looking at your website you certainly have a couple of things going for you, a specialization in sport and several commercial clients and commissions. I think you could improve the presentation of your website however, which will put you in a stronger position to attract an agent to line up a meeting in the first place. Lay out your categories in a clearer and concise way, as at the moment you have some categories by style and some by project title. Portfolio or Overview, Sports, Portraits, Reportage, Commissions, Projects, About would work better in my opinion. I would get rid of Fashion as a section and just include some of the images in the Portrait or Reportage sections. Personally the word Resume is a bit American for me and I prefer About which can also include a client list and contact details. I would also loose the captions in the black boxes, makes it look a bit clunky. You can include info on the shots in About.

Looking through you have some really nice images, but I would recommend a bit of a purge. You have a lot if images on there, some a lot stronger than others. I really like your shots of Basketball:

basketball6

But I’m not such a fan of the shots with more obvious poses:

Basketball7

Having said that, you do have lots of set up portraits that will go down well in the commercial market. Generally the one’s with a bit more going on, one’s with an interesting composition or humour in them. (more…)

Ask an Agent / ‘Rights Grabbing’ Photography Competitions

October 30, 2013

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

LisaASKanAgent5

This month Ask an Agent advises on whether or not to enter photography competitions that ask you to assign copyright.

Dear Ask an Agent,

I know it’s generally a good idea to enter photography competitions, not just to win prizes but to raise your profile, but I’ve noticed that some competitions have written in the small print that by entering you hand over your rights to the images you enter. It would be interesting to hear what you think about this and if they are still worth entering.

Andy Gifford, Cardiff, Wales.

Hi Andy,

Thanks for asking me about this. You are right, entering competitions should be a positive thing for photographers, the kudos of winning or being shortlisted can be a valuable pr opportunity that might benefit your career.

Most prestigious competitions are careful to state that entrants work will only be used in conjunction with promoting the competition. However, sadly, photography competitions exist that ask entrants to ‘assign all rights, title and interest in the photography, including all copyrights in exchange for Prizes’ or something along those lines.

What do I think about this? I think it’s outrageous and unnecessary, it’s potentially exploitative and very bad professional practice.

I’m not even sure that this is what most of the competition promoters or sponsors actually require or desire. I believe in many cases it’s due to a lack of knowledge about the industry, either on the part of the people that run the competition or the lawyers that advise them to use these terms. The result – a blanket set of competition terms of conditions are utilised and the promoters probably don’t even realise the gravity of what they are asking.

Let me just spell out what a ‘rights grab’ is and why they are a no no. When a photographer creates an image he automatically owns the intellectual property (IP) or the copyright in his images. He should be the only person with the authority to grant a licence to use or reproduce the images. This should not be threatened, it should be non negotiable. To ask an ‘entrant’ to surrender copyright is to ask them to surrender control of where the images appear, forever. So in theory the images could be sold on by the people running the competition to any publication, brand or business. As I say, I’m not convinced this is always the intention but best not to agree to it just incase!

I would advise any photographer to read the small print when entering photography competitions and any competition promoter to delete any clauses that suggest a rights grab, making it clear that images entered will only be used in conjunction with and context of the competition- if they want to attract professionals and not be seen as being exploitative that is.

(more…)

Ask an Agent / Someone’s used my image without my permission!

September 27, 2013

 Document type 800 800

Ask an Agent is a regular monthly column that answers all your dilemmas about the business of photography – a sort of photography agony aunt. Whatever area of the industry you are in, if you have any questions you’d like to ask please send them to askanagent@lisapritchard.com.

This month Ask an Agent advises on the thorny issue of copyright infringement.

I’ve just noticed an image of mine of a kite in the sky is being used on the website of a hotel chain without my permission. If this isn’t bad enough it was commissioned recently by another client and the image is still licensed to them. What should I do?

 A Photographer, Anonymous

There’s nothing more infuriating than spotting an image being used when no agreement has been made. Most of the time people aren’t even aware that what they are doing is wrong, a sad truth in this industry, but the more we can educate people the better.

Here’s what to do:

Step 1: Take a screen grab of the image in context.

You can use this as evidence.

Step 2: Double check they definitely are in breach of copyright.

By the sounds of it, if the image has been commissioned recently and your client is unhappy, they are. Sometimes when people commission photography they request that the images can be used by associated companies or subsidiaries for example so check your small print. By turn you should specify very clearly on your invoice ( and on your estimate) who you are licencing your images to.

Step 3: Contact the ‘infringer’. Point out what they have done and ask them to remove the image immediately.

Personally I like to keep things a little informal at this stage, threatening legal letters can come next if you need to get a bit more heavy handed.

Something along the lines of…

‘’Dear xxx

I have just noticed that my image (attached) is being used without permission on the xxx website. As the photographer I own the copyright to this image and as such am the only person who has the authority to grant reproduction rights. No reproduction rights have been granted to you to use this image in this instance, this is copyright infringement and against the law.

Not only are you in breach of copyright but you have caused upset between me and my client who a) commissioned this image recently and b) has a current agreement to exclusively use this image. (note: add this bit if this is the case, it is usual professional practice that only the photographer can use the image for self promotion whilst the original usage is in licence)

To avoid further action by either my client or my lawyer please remove the image with immediate effect. ‘’

(This is my idea of informal btw!) Hopefully that will be the end of it, if not…

Step 4: Get your lawyer to send a letter.

Two very good copyright lawyers are Swan Turton and Michael Simkins.  For a flat fee they will send a copyright infringement letter.

Step 5: Take legal action.

And then the final, drastic step ( hope it doesn’t come to this) would be to take legal action and sue them for copyright infringement and potential damages as a result of compromising your relationship with your client.

In a different situation where an image could be available for use there is an alternative, and that is to grant them a usage licence so they can legally use the image once they have paid.

Ask the ‘infringer’ what specific usage they do require and if they fail to tell you or aren’t sure invoice for the usage you can see, e.g online usage for 3 months, and specify that any further usage above and beyond this needs to be negotiated. I suggest 3 or 4 times what you would usually charge given the circumstances and point out that the image still cannot be used until this is settled in full. Clarify though that these fees only apply if you do not have to take legal action, are simply your attempt to settle the situation and will have no affect on any further compensation the courts decide to impose.

Of course there is the whole can of worms that might be opened if there are people featured in the shots, model releases and model fees would also then need to be agreed and invoiced. I’m assuming there aren’t any in this case as you say the image is of a kite in the sky.

Good luck with that then!

Looking forward to answering more questions next month, so keep them coming to askanagent@lisapritchard.com

 

Please Note:

We reserve the right to shorten questions due to space constraints.

We reserve the right not to enter into ongoing correspondence.

We reserve the right not to answer all questions.

Please state whether you would like to remain anonymous.

This advice should be taken as a guide only. Lisa Pritchard and LPA take no responsibility for any omissions or errors. Please seek professional legal advice should you require it.

 

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